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What should I do when I can't use my cell phone?

USA TODAY sent this email to their subscribers on February 23, 2024.

AT&T's outage showed how much we need our cell phones. ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌  ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ ͏‌ 

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USA TODAY

The Daily Briefing

YOUR MORNING NEWS ROUNDUP

Fri Feb 23 2024

 

Nicole Fallert Newsletter Writer

@nicolefallert

A visitor walks past US multinational telecommunications AT&T logo at the Mobile World Congress (MWC), the telecom industry's biggest annual gathering, in Barcelona on February 27, 2023. (Photo by Pau BARRENA / AFP) (Photo by PAU BARRENA/AFP via Getty Images)

AT&T's outage showed how much we need our cell phones.

A widespread telecommunication outage that affected tens of thousands of customers in the United States showed how reliant today's world is on access to mobile services. Also in the news: What President Joe Biden's executive order on the border means for progressives and the Eras Tour is taking on Sydney, Australia.

🙋🏼‍♀️ I'm Nicole Fallert, Daily Briefing author.  Why are people walking barefoot in public?

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Here's the news to know Friday.

AT&T outage shows what can happen when cell service goes out

There's a long list of potential emergency situations when cell phones could become unreliable, and some Americans were confronted first-hand on Thursday with the scary reality of what they would do in the case they had no cellular device.

Without cell phones, people might not be able to use two-factor authentication to get into email and other accounts. Internet-connected credit card readers could go down and some emergency services can only be reached via landline phones.

AT&T has restored service to all customers after the nationwide outage left tens of thousands without key functions on Thursday — but the telecommunication company did not explain the cause of the outage or share how many people were affected.
The White House says there's no reason to suspect a cyber security incident, but the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Homeland Security are working with the tech industry to investigate the cause of the outage.
What should you do to prepare for a cell service outage? Keep cash on hand, print out important documents and maybe consider keeping that old landline.

Related: Use these messaging apps when you don't have service and some AT&T customers coped with ... doughnuts?!

Oklahoma teen's death puts gender identity in spotlight

The death of 16-year-old Nex Benedict in the wake of a fight at an Owasso, Oklahoma, high school has drawn widespread attention after reports that the teen was long bullied for their gender identity, which friends have described as "gender expansive." But what does gender expansive mean? According to national LGBTQ+ advocacy group PFLAG, it's an umbrella term for individuals who don’t align with traditional gender categories, or who expand ideas of gender expression or identity. Read more

Here's why some teachers and students are wary about discussing gender identity.

More news to know now

Tomorrow marks two years of war in Ukraine. These photos show life before and after war with Russia.
President Biden met with Alexei Navalny's widow and daughter.
Here's your guide to the South Carolina Republican primary this weekend.
Panda diplomacy is back: China will send our favorite animals to the San Diego Zoo.
On today's The Excerpt podcastTexas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing a Catholic migrant aid organization for alleged human smuggling. Listen on Apple PodcastsSpotify, or your smart speaker.

What's the weather today? Check your local forecast here.

Israel, Hamas 'willing to give concessions' in new cease-fire talks

Stalled negotiations for a cease-fire in Gaza and the release of hostages will resume Friday after the Israeli War Cabinet agreed to send a delegation to Paris for weekend talks, Israeli media reported. There were signs of more flexibility on both sides after Israel's Prime Benjamin Netanyahu called back his team from talks in Cairo last week, citing “delusional” demands from Hamas. The talks come as a chorus of international voices call for a temporary truce that may lead to a longer halt in fighting, and urged Israel not to bring into Rafah an offensive that would exacerbate a humanitarian crisis. Read more

Student loan forgiveness talks are nearing an end: What does that mean?

Education Department officials will carry on Friday wrangling with borrowers and experts over the details of the Biden administration's latest student loan forgiveness proposal. President Joe Biden's recent plan, a win for progressives, would ease the burdens of many Americans who feel financially crushed by the weight of their student loans. The talks underway are exploring more ways to ease the student loan crisis, apart from a separate announcement on Wednesday, in which Biden said 150,000 long-time borrowers would be forgiven for $1.2 billion in student loans. Read more

Keep scrolling

Hydeia Broadbent, HIV/AIDS activist who raised awareness on TV at young age, has died at 39.
Attempts to bribe postal workers and bank fraud using stolen mail underscore USPS concerns.
Caitlin Clark struggled as the Hawkeyes were upset by the Hoosiers.
Travis Kelce and Taylor Swift visited the Sydney Zoo.
Bad Bunny kicked off his Most Wanted tour in Utah with a horse, floating stages and yeehaw fashion.
Review: Netflix's "Avatar: The Last Airbender" is a failure in every way.

Biden mulls executive action on border amid progressive backlash

 Even before any action is taken, progressives are pushing back as President Joe Biden considers using executive authority on the southern border to restrict migrants' ability to seek asylum if they cross illegally. Although no decision has been made on unilateral executive action, Biden is exploring turning to federal immigration powers previously deployed by former President Donald Trump to enact a crackdown on the U.S.-Mexico border amid record migration, reports say. The immediate backlash underscores the delicate line Biden must walk as he navigates the border crisis during the 2024 election. Read more

Photo of the day: Facing the elements for the Eras Tour

Rain and lightning interrupted the start of the Eras Tour for night one in Sydney, Australia, canceling Sabrina Carpenter’s opening act and delaying Taylor Swift’s start by twenty minutes. But as soon as the weather cleared the open roofed stadium, the electricity in the stands ignited. What secret songs were performed?

Afp 2023795760

Fans of US singer Taylor Swift, also known as a Swifties, shelter from the rain as they arrive for Swift's concert in Sydney on February 23, 2024.

DAVID GRAY, AFP via Getty Images

Nicole Fallert is a newsletter writer at USA TODAY, sign up for the email here. Want to send Nicole a note? Shoot her an email at [email protected] or follow along with her musings on  Twitter. Support journalism like this – .

Associated Press contributed reporting.

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Advertisement eNewspaper       |        Crosswords       |       Horoscopes Read in browser USA TODAY THE DAILY BRIEFING YOUR MORNING NEWS ROUNDUP Fri Feb 23 2024 NICOLE FALLERT | NEWSLETTER WRITER @nicolefallert WHAT SHOULD I DO WHEN I CAN'T USE MY CELL PHONE? A visitor walks past US multinational telecommunications AT&T logo at the Mobile World Congress (MWC), the telecom industry's biggest annual gathering, in Barcelona on February 27, 2023. (Photo by Pau BARRENA / AFP) (Photo by PAU BARRENA/AFP via Getty Images) AT&T's outage showed how much we need our cell phones. A widespread telecommunication outage that affected tens of thousands of customers in the United States showed how reliant today's world is on access to mobile services. Also in the news: What President Joe Biden's executive order on the border means for progressives and the Eras Tour is taking on Sydney, Australia. 🙋🏼‍♀️ I'm Nicole Fallert, Daily Briefing author.  Why are people walking barefoot in public? Advertisement Here's the news to know Friday. AT&T OUTAGE SHOWS WHAT CAN HAPPEN WHEN CELL SERVICE GOES OUT There's a long list of potential emergency situations when cell phones could become unreliable, and some Americans were confronted first-hand on Thursday with the scary reality of what they would do in the case they had no cellular device. Without cell phones, people might not be able to use two-factor authentication to get into email and other accounts. Internet-connected credit card readers could go down and some emergency services can only be reached via landline phones. •AT&T has restored service to all customers after the nationwide outage left tens of thousands without key functions on Thursday — but the telecommunication company did not explain the cause of the outage or share how many people were affected. •The White House says there's no reason to suspect a cyber security incident, but the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Homeland Security are working with the tech industry to investigate the cause of the outage. •What should you do to prepare for a cell service outage? Keep cash on hand, print out important documents and maybe consider keeping that old landline. Related: Use these messaging apps when you don't have service and some AT&T customers coped with ... doughnuts?! OKLAHOMA TEEN'S DEATH PUTS GENDER IDENTITY IN SPOTLIGHT The death of 16-year-old Nex Benedict in the wake of a fight at an Owasso, Oklahoma, high school has drawn widespread attention after reports that the teen was long bullied for their gender identity, which friends have described as "gender expansive." But what does gender expansive mean? According to national LGBTQ+ advocacy group PFLAG, it's an umbrella term for individuals who don’t align with traditional gender categories, or who expand ideas of gender expression or identity. Read more •Here's why some teachers and students are wary about discussing gender identity. MORE NEWS TO KNOW NOW •Tomorrow marks two years of war in Ukraine. These photos show life before and after war with Russia. •President Biden met with Alexei Navalny's widow and daughter. •Here's your guide to the South Carolina Republican primary this weekend. •Panda diplomacy is back: China will send our favorite animals to the San Diego Zoo. •On today's The Excerpt podcast, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing a Catholic migrant aid organization for alleged human smuggling. Listen on Apple Podcasts,  Spotify, or your smart speaker. What's the weather today? Check your local forecast here. ISRAEL, HAMAS 'WILLING TO GIVE CONCESSIONS' IN NEW CEASE-FIRE TALKS Stalled negotiations for a cease-fire in Gaza and the release of hostages will resume Friday after the Israeli War Cabinet agreed to send a delegation to Paris for weekend talks, Israeli media reported. There were signs of more flexibility on both sides after Israel's Prime Benjamin Netanyahu called back his team from talks in Cairo last week, citing “delusional” demands from Hamas. The talks come as a chorus of international voices call for a temporary truce that may lead to a longer halt in fighting, and urged Israel not to bring into Rafah an offensive that would exacerbate a humanitarian crisis. Read more STUDENT LOAN FORGIVENESS TALKS ARE NEARING AN END: WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? Education Department officials will carry on Friday wrangling with borrowers and experts over the details of the Biden administration's latest student loan forgiveness proposal. President Joe Biden's recent plan, a win for progressives, would ease the burdens of many Americans who feel financially crushed by the weight of their student loans. The talks underway are exploring more ways to ease the student loan crisis, apart from a separate announcement on Wednesday, in which Biden said 150,000 long-time borrowers would be forgiven for $1.2 billion in student loans. Read more KEEP SCROLLING •Hydeia Broadbent, HIV/AIDS activist who raised awareness on TV at young age, has died at 39. •Attempts to bribe postal workers and bank fraud using stolen mail underscore USPS concerns. •Caitlin Clark struggled as the Hawkeyes were upset by the Hoosiers. •Travis Kelce and Taylor Swift visited the Sydney Zoo. •Bad Bunny kicked off his Most Wanted tour in Utah with a horse, floating stages and yeehaw fashion. •Review: Netflix's "Avatar: The Last Airbender" is a failure in every way. BIDEN MULLS EXECUTIVE ACTION ON BORDER AMID PROGRESSIVE BACKLASH  Even before any action is taken, progressives are pushing back as President Joe Biden considers using executive authority on the southern border to restrict migrants' ability to seek asylum if they cross illegally. Although no decision has been made on unilateral executive action, Biden is exploring turning to federal immigration powers previously deployed by former President Donald Trump to enact a crackdown on the U.S.-Mexico border amid record migration, reports say. The immediate backlash underscores the delicate line Biden must walk as he navigates the border crisis during the 2024 election. Read more PHOTO OF THE DAY: FACING THE ELEMENTS FOR THE ERAS TOUR Rain and lightning interrupted the start of the Eras Tour for night one in Sydney, Australia, canceling Sabrina Carpenter’s opening act and delaying Taylor Swift’s start by twenty minutes. But as soon as the weather cleared the open roofed stadium, the electricity in the stands ignited. What secret songs were performed? Afp 2023795760 Fans of US singer Taylor Swift, also known as a Swifties, shelter from the rain as they arrive for Swift's concert in Sydney on February 23, 2024. DAVID GRAY, AFP via Getty Images Nicole Fallert is a newsletter writer at USA TODAY, sign up for the email here. Want to send Nicole a note? Shoot her an email at [email protected] or follow along with her musings on  Twitter. Support journalism like this – . Associated Press contributed reporting. Advertisement ELECTIONS /2024 Know Your Vote VOTE WITH CONFIDENCE This 7-day newsletter course will help you be an informed voter before Nov. 5. SIGN UP NOW Follow Us Problem viewing email?  •  Manage Newsletters  •    •    •   Privacy Notice  •    •  Feedback
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