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How big a problem is antimicrobial resistance? | Global Dispatch

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Editor's note
Antimicrobial resistance is hardly a term that trips off the tongue but it is one we are all going to have to get to grips with.

In an exclusive interview this week with our new global health reporter Kat Lay, Dame Sally Davies, the UK’s special envoy on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), warned that the rise of these drug-resistant superbugs could make the Covid pandemic look “minor”.

Inevitably, those who will bear the brunt include many of the countries being hit hardest by the climate crisis, in yet another example of this intersection between health and the environment. One death in five caused by AMR is a child aged under five, usually in sub-Saharan Africa, where Davies said the problem is “particularly prevalent and disastrous”. You can see the impact of AMR in your country here and we will be closely following developments around the topic.

In September, the UN will hold a high-level meeting on the issue and the UN Global Leaders Group on AMR, which Davies is a member of, will be pushing for a range of targets to tackle the problem. Our global health reporter will be on the case.

Max Benato, deputy editor, Foundations and Philanthropic Projects
Spotlight
AMR  
Rise of drug-resistant superbugs could make Covid pandemic look ‘minor’, expert warns
Rise of drug-resistant superbugs could make Covid pandemic look ‘minor’, expert warns
Top picks
Sudan  
Children ‘piled up and shot’: new details emerge of ethnic cleansing in Darfur
Children ‘piled up and shot’: new details emerge of ethnic cleansing in Darfur
‘I want to decide my vote myself'  
How women are shaping India’s political landscape
How women are shaping India’s political landscape
Castoffs to catwalk  
Fashion show shines light on vast Chile clothes dump visible from space
Fashion show shines light on vast Chile clothes dump visible from space
‘A colonial mindset’  
Why global aid agencies need to get out of the way
Why global aid agencies need to get out of the way
Rights and freedom
Why has Saudi Arabia targeted these three sisters?
‘They’ve destroyed us because of some tweets’  
Why has Saudi Arabia targeted these three sisters?
Last week one was sentenced to 11 years, another had to flee the country, a third could be arrested at any moment. And what were Manahel, Maryam and Fawzia al-Otaibi’s ‘crimes’? A few social media posts that outraged Saudi Arabia’s conservatives
‘I decided to not let anybody silence my voice’  
The journalists in exile but still at risk
A common condition
Experts condemn US tobacco firm’s sponsorship of doctor training as ‘grotesque’
Big tobacco  
Experts condemn US tobacco firm’s sponsorship of doctor training as ‘grotesque’
Philip Morris International has supported non-smoking programmes around the world ‘to advance its own interests’, say health professionals
Southern frontlines
What went wrong – and what does the future hold?
Brazil floods  
What went wrong – and what does the future hold?
In the country’s south, up to half of the annual predicted rain fell in just 10 days – the third such event in a year. Experts say it is time to plan for a new normal
What we're reading
The award-winning Nigerian writer's novel is a  TN [ttt cr
A Spell of Good Things by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀  
The award-winning Nigerian writer's novel is a "story of modern Nigeria and two families caught in the riptides of wealth, power, romantic obsession and political corruption". It is shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas prize, awarded to writers in the English language aged 39 or under. The winner will be announced on 16 May.
In case you missed it
‘You need to be brave’  
Tigray’s female cyclists ride again in the aftermath of war
Tigray’s female cyclists ride again in the aftermath of war
Find us here
X (formerly Twitter): @gdndevelopment | @tracymcveigh | @LizFordGuardian | @isabelchoat | @The Guardianmcveigh1 

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Website: theguardian.com/global-development
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Global Dispatch | The Guardian Support the Guardian Support us   Fund independent journalism GTzll1 A Global Dispatch Editor's note Antimicrobial resistance is hardly a term that trips off the tongue but it is one we are all going to have to get to grips with. In an exclusive interview this week with our new global health reporter Kat Lay, Dame Sally Davies, the UK’s special envoy on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), warned that the rise of these drug-resistant superbugs could make the Covid pandemic look “minor”. Inevitably, those who will bear the brunt include many of the countries being hit hardest by the climate crisis, in yet another example of this intersection between health and the environment. One death in five caused by AMR is a child aged under five, usually in sub-Saharan Africa, where Davies said the problem is “particularly prevalent and disastrous”. You can see the impact of AMR in your country here and we will be closely following developments around the topic. In September, the UN will hold a high-level meeting on the issue and the UN Global Leaders Group on AMR, which Davies is a member of, will be pushing for a range of targets to tackle the problem. Our global health reporter will be on the case. Max Benato, deputy editor, Foundations and Philanthropic Projects Spotlight AMR   Rise of drug-resistant superbugs could make Covid pandemic look ‘minor’, expert warns Rise of drug-resistant superbugs could make Covid pandemic look ‘minor’, expert warns Top picks Sudan   Children ‘piled up and shot’: new details emerge of ethnic cleansing in Darfur Children ‘piled up and shot’: new details emerge of ethnic cleansing in Darfur ‘I want to decide my vote myself'   How women are shaping India’s political landscape How women are shaping India’s political landscape Castoffs to catwalk   Fashion show shines light on vast Chile clothes dump visible from space Fashion show shines light on vast Chile clothes dump visible from space ‘A colonial mindset’   Why global aid agencies need to get out of the way Why global aid agencies need to get out of the way Rights and freedom Why has Saudi Arabia targeted these three sisters? ‘They’ve destroyed us because of some tweets’   Why has Saudi Arabia targeted these three sisters? Last week one was sentenced to 11 years, another had to flee the country, a third could be arrested at any moment. And what were Manahel, Maryam and Fawzia al-Otaibi’s ‘crimes’? A few social media posts that outraged Saudi Arabia’s conservatives ‘I decided to not let anybody silence my voice’   The journalists in exile but still at risk A common condition Experts condemn US tobacco firm’s sponsorship of doctor training as ‘grotesque’ Big tobacco   Experts condemn US tobacco firm’s sponsorship of doctor training as ‘grotesque’ Philip Morris International has supported non-smoking programmes around the world ‘to advance its own interests’, say health professionals Southern frontlines What went wrong – and what does the future hold? Brazil floods   What went wrong – and what does the future hold? In the country’s south, up to half of the annual predicted rain fell in just 10 days – the third such event in a year. Experts say it is time to plan for a new normal What we're reading The award-winning Nigerian writer's novel is a TN [ttt cr A Spell of Good Things by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀   The award-winning Nigerian writer's novel is a "story of modern Nigeria and two families caught in the riptides of wealth, power, romantic obsession and political corruption". It is shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas prize, awarded to writers in the English language aged 39 or under. The winner will be announced on 16 May. In case you missed it ‘You need to be brave’   Tigray’s female cyclists ride again in the aftermath of war Tigray’s female cyclists ride again in the aftermath of war Find us here X (formerly Twitter): @gdndevelopment | @tracymcveigh | @LizFordGuardian | @isabelchoat | @The Guardianmcveigh1  Facebook: Guardian global development Website: theguardian.com/global-development Get in touch If you have any questions or comments about any of our newsletters please email [email protected] … there is a good reason why not to support the Guardian Not everyone can afford to pay for news right now. That is why we keep our journalism open for everyone to read. If this is you, please continue to read for free. But if you are able to, then there are three good reasons to support us today. 1 Our quality, investigative journalism is a powerful force for scrutiny at a time when the rich and powerful are getting away with more and more 2 We are independent and have no billionaire owner telling us what to report, so your money directly powers our reporting 3 It doesn’t cost much, and takes less time than it took to read this message Help power the Guardian’s journalism in this crucial year of news, whether with a small sum or a larger one. If you can, please support us on a monthly basis. It takes less than a minute to set up, and you can rest assured that you're making a big impact every single month in support of open, independent journalism. Thank you. Support us   Manage your emails | | Trouble viewing? You are receiving this email because you are a subscriber to Global Dispatch. Guardian News & Media Limited - a member of Guardian Media Group PLC. Registered Office: Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1 9GU. Registered in England No. 908396                                                            
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