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Let's propagate a plant this weekend 🌱

Modern Botanical sent this email to their subscribers on May 19, 2023.

Hi - it's Friday! Which means tomorrow is Saturday and the day after is Sunday. Making Fridays a really really good day of the week for most of us :) 

Somewhere in this window of days, I want you to do yourself a favor and propagate a plant this weekend. If you've done this before - you know I'm only asking for 2 minutes of your time. If you're new to growing in water AND have plants around your house, then let me walk you through it really quickly! 

As a bonus to incentivize those of you who are new to this - if you have NEVER purchased from us before, propagate a plant this weekend, and send me a photo at [email protected] - I'll send you some hydroponic nutrients for the cost of shipping ($5). 

So let's get to propagation. If you'd like a more detailed set of instructions, you can find those here. For the abbreviated instructions, here you go: 

What you'll need to get started: 

- A sterile cutting utensil like a knife or scissors

- Your favorite plant with nodes - we recommend a pothos, monstera, or philodendron as great starter plants but angel wing begonias and syngoniums make for great starter plants, too! 

- A vessel that holds water: this can be a Modern Botanical product like these here, but can also simply be a cup from your cupboard or vase from a thrift shop. We love water propagation because it's so accessible - most of what we offer is just a simple beautiful way that easily goes up on your walls as living decor

- Optional Hydroponic Nutrient Drops like these ( this is what we're offering to ship you for the cost of shipping! )

Getting started: 

  1. Identify your node: to take your cutting for propagation, you'll need to be able to identify a node on your plant. If you want a visual reference - a quick google search for "what is a node" and going to images will answer this for you. Basically the node is going to be the point on the stem that the leaf grows from, often presenting as something like a ridge that wraps around the circumference of your stem. That is your node! Nodes carry the genetic information to grow either a leaf, a root, or both depending on environmental stimuli. 
  2. Take your cutting: Once you know what to look for to find a node, you'll want to take a cutting. My perfect cutting is usually 3 to 4 nodes where you have 2 to 4 leaves intact. Make your cutting right below the 3rd or 4th node, then remove the leaf on the 4th and optionally 3rd node. A few tips on cutting: ideally cut at a 45 degree angle or somewhere about there, more leaves than 2 or 3 can actually reduce your propagation rate because there will be too much plant life to support without any available roots to provide nutrients, take your cutting from a healthy plant! 
  3. Set your cutting in water: now that you have your cutting, drop it in water such that at least your bottom two nodes are submerged! It's okay to have all your nodes submerged so long as your leaves are above the water line! For water selection, municipal water often works but it's ideal to used filtered or distilled water when available
  4. Optionally add nutrients: our hydroponic nutrients have kelp extract which provides a rooting hormone that promotes root growth. However, pothos, philodendrons, and monsteras all have their own rooting hormones in large amounts and all tend to propagate at high rates naturally! Either way, now is the time to add nutrients if you have them. 
  5. Sit tight and wait for root growth: this could be 1 week to 2 months depending on the time of the year, environmental settings like temperature and lighting, and the plant variety. For now, simply make sure the plant gets good indirect lighting and a water replacement every 2 weeks or so. 
And just like that, you'll have a new plant in no time! Propagations, once established in water, are genetic duplicates of the mother plant you cut them from! You'll have the option to keep growing them in water with periodic water refreshes and nutrients, or to transplant them into soil shortly after seeing them grow roots. 
 
That's it! So let's all go propagate a plant this weekend. I will be sure to do so here as well. Feel free to share or respond with any questions. 
 
Happy Friday to you all :) 
 
Best,
Conrad 

Text-only version of this email

Hi - it's Friday! Which means tomorrow is Saturday and the day after is Sunday. Making Fridays a really really good day of the week for most of us :)  Somewhere in this window of days, I want you to do yourself a favor and propagate a plant this weekend. If you've done this before - you know I'm only asking for 2 minutes of your time. If you're new to growing in water AND have plants around your house, then let me walk you through it really quickly!  As a bonus to incentivize those of you who are new to this - if you have NEVER purchased from us before, propagate a plant this weekend, and send me a photo at [email protected] - I'll send you some hydroponic nutrients for the cost of shipping ($5).  So let's get to propagation. If you'd like a more detailed set of instructions, you can find those here. For the abbreviated instructions, here you go:  What you'll need to get started:  - A sterile cutting utensil like a knife or scissors - Your favorite plant with nodes - we recommend a pothos, monstera, or philodendron as great starter plants but angel wing begonias and syngoniums make for great starter plants, too!  - A vessel that holds water: this can be a Modern Botanical product like these here, but can also simply be a cup from your cupboard or vase from a thrift shop. We love water propagation because it's so accessible - most of what we offer is just a simple beautiful way that easily goes up on your walls as living decor - Optional Hydroponic Nutrient Drops like these ( this is what we're offering to ship you for the cost of shipping! ) Getting started:  1. Identify your node: to take your cutting for propagation, you'll need to be able to identify a node on your plant. If you want a visual reference - a quick google search for "what is a node" and going to images will answer this for you. Basically the node is going to be the point on the stem that the leaf grows from, often presenting as something like a ridge that wraps around the circumference of your stem. That is your node! Nodes carry the genetic information to grow either a leaf, a root, or both depending on environmental stimuli.  2. Take your cutting: Once you know what to look for to find a node, you'll want to take a cutting. My perfect cutting is usually 3 to 4 nodes where you have 2 to 4 leaves intact. Make your cutting right below the 3rd or 4th node, then remove the leaf on the 4th and optionally 3rd node. A few tips on cutting: ideally cut at a 45 degree angle or somewhere about there, more leaves than 2 or 3 can actually reduce your propagation rate because there will be too much plant life to support without any available roots to provide nutrients, take your cutting from a healthy plant!  3. Set your cutting in water: now that you have your cutting, drop it in water such that at least your bottom two nodes are submerged! It's okay to have all your nodes submerged so long as your leaves are above the water line! For water selection, municipal water often works but it's ideal to used filtered or distilled water when available 4. Optionally add nutrients: our hydroponic nutrients have kelp extract which provides a rooting hormone that promotes root growth. However, pothos, philodendrons, and monsteras all have their own rooting hormones in large amounts and all tend to propagate at high rates naturally! Either way, now is the time to add nutrients if you have them.  5. Sit tight and wait for root growth: this could be 1 week to 2 months depending on the time of the year, environmental settings like temperature and lighting, and the plant variety. For now, simply make sure the plant gets good indirect lighting and a water replacement every 2 weeks or so.  And just like that, you'll have a new plant in no time! Propagations, once established in water, are genetic duplicates of the mother plant you cut them from! You'll have the option to keep growing them in water with periodic water refreshes and nutrients, or to transplant them into soil shortly after seeing them grow roots.  That's it! So let's all go propagate a plant this weekend. I will be sure to do so here as well. Feel free to share or respond with any questions.  Happy Friday to you all :)  Best, Conrad 
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