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[iJMR] Supporting Midwifery Students During Clinical Practice: Results of a Systematic Scoping Review

JMIR Publications sent this email to their subscribers on April 22, 2023.

interactive Journal of Medical Research WS
JMIR Publications

Content Update Alert, Friday 21st April 2023

Recently Published

Supporting Midwifery Students During Clinical Practice: Results of a Systematic Scoping Review

Hafaza Amod, Sipho Wellington Mkhize
Source: freepik.com; Copyright: pch.vector; URL: https://www.freepik.com/free-photo/cropped-image-smiling-pregnant-woman-midwife-home-woman-casual-clothes-lying-bed-midwife-holding-hand-pregnancy-medicine-home-birth-concept_26921579.htm; License: Licensed by JMIR.
Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 21); 12(1):e36380
HTML (open access): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e36380
PDF (free): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e36380/PDF
Background: Midwifery educators are highly concerned about the quality of clinical support offered to midwifery students during clinical placement. The unpreparedness of midwifery practitioners in mentorship roles and responsibilities affects the competence levels of the next-generation midwives being produced.
Objective: The aim of this paper is to highlight various clinical support interventions to support midwifery students globally and propose a framework to guide mentorship training in South Africa...
read more

Creation of a Holistic Platform for Health Boosting Using a Blockchain-Based Approach: Development Study

Juan Lopez-Barreiro, Luis Alvarez-Sabucedo, Jose-Luis Garcia-Soidan, Juan M Santos-Gago
Source: Freepik; Copyright: Freepik; URL: https://www.freepik.com/free-photo/hands-holding-smartphone-close-up_20262590.htm; License: Licensed by JMIR.
Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 19); 12(1):e44135
HTML (open access): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e44135
PDF (free): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e44135/PDF
Background: Low adherence to healthy habits, which is associated with a higher risk of disease and death, among citizens of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries is a serious concern. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the physical activity (PA) guidelines for Americans provide recommendations on PA and healthy diets. To promote these habits, we suggest using a blockchain-based platform, using the PA Messaging Framework to deliver messages and rewards to users. Blockchain is a decentralized secure platform for data management, which can be used for value-added controls and services such as smart contracts (SCs), oracles, and decentralized applications (dApps). Of note, there is a substantial penetration of blockchain technologies in the field of PA, but there is a need for more implementations of dApps to take advantage of features such as nonfungible tokens.
Objective: This study aimed to create a comprehensive platform for promoting healthy habits, using scientific evidence and blockchain technology. The platform will use gamification to encourage healthy PA and eating habits; in addition, it will monitor the activities through noninvasive means, evaluate them using open-source software, and follow up through blockchain messages...
read more

The Relation Between Students’ Theoretical Knowledge and Practical Skills in Endodontics: Retrospective Analysis

Franziska Haupt, Philipp Kanzow
Student training of endodontic treatments using phantom heads. Source: University Medical Center Göttingen; Copyright: Patrice Kunte; URL: https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e46305; License: Licensed by the authors.
Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 18); 12(1):e46305
HTML (open access): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e46305
PDF (free): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e46305/PDF
Background: Dental undergraduate students are required to show sufficient practical skills prior to treating patients. Practical skills and the underlying theoretical knowledge are taught in preclinical courses. Usually, the learning outcome is assessed in written multiple-choice examinations (theoretical knowledge) and practical skills tests. However, students’ assessment of practical skills is more time consuming and prone to bias than objective multiple-choice examinations.
Objective: This study aims to analyze the relation between students’ theoretical knowledge and practical skills in endodontics. Furthermore, the predictive validity of a theoretical knowledge assessment on students’ practical skills was assessed...
read more

Evolution of Health Information Sharing Between Health Care Organizations: Potential of Nonfungible Tokens

Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh
AI-generated image, in response to the request "a picture to show two physicians are sharing health information of patients", (Generator: Daelle-E2/ OpenAI, March 16th, 2023, Requestor: Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh). Source: Created with DALL-E2, an AI system by OpenAI; Copyright: N/A (AI-generated image); URL: https://labs.openai.com/s/dTCOKckfFD6BVGMAZ0E4RvZV; License: Public Domain (CC0).
Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 12); 12(1):e42685
HTML (open access): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e42685
PDF (free): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e42685/PDF
This study attempts to explain the development and progress of the technology used for sharing health information across health care organizations (such as hospitals and physicians’ offices). First, we describe the strengths and weaknesses of traditional sharing models, health information exchange (HIE), and blockchain-based HIE. Second, the potential use of nonfungible token (NFT) protocols in HIE models is proposed as the next possible move for information-sharing initiatives in health care. In addition to some potential opportunities and distinguishing features (eg, ownability, verifiability, and incentivization), we identify the uncertainty and risks associated with the application of NFTs, such as the lack of a dedicated regulatory framework for legal ownership of digital patient data. This paper is among the first to discuss the potential of NFTs in health care. The use of NFTs in HIE networks could generate a new stream of research for future studies. This study provides practical insights into how the technological foundations of information-sharing efforts in health care have developed and diversified from earlier forms.


Effects of Antidepressants on COVID-19 Outcomes: Retrospective Study on Large-Scale Electronic Health Record Data

Md Mahmudur Rahman, Atqiya Munawara Mahi, Rachel Melamed, Mohammad Arif Ul Alam
Source: Pexels; Copyright: Atypeek Dgn; URL: https://www.pexels.com/photo/coronavirus-dashboard-with-map-and-statistic-6366444/; License: Licensed by JMIR. R ST NSRRGSR S N N e Grea RN fES T k;l ESE ARG O
Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 11); 12(1):e39455
HTML (open access): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e39455
PDF (free): https://www.i-jmr.org/2023/1/e39455/PDF
Background: Antidepressants exert an anticholinergic effect in varying degrees, and various classes of antidepressants can produce a different effect on immune function. While the early use of antidepressants has a notional effect on COVID-19 outcomes, the relationship between the risk of COVID-19 severity and the use of antidepressants has not been properly investigated previously owing to the high costs involved with clinical trials. Large-scale observational data and recent advancements in statistical analysis provide ample opportunity to virtualize a clinical trial to discover the detrimental effects of the early use of antidepressants.
Objective: We primarily aimed to investigate electronic health records for causal effect estimation and use the data for discovering the causal effects of early antidepressant use on COVID-19 outcomes. As a secondary aim, we developed methods for validating our causal effect estimation pipeline...
read more

Latest Announcements

View All
i-JMR to receive Impact Factor in 2023
(Toronto, July 27, 2022) The Interactive Journal of Medical Research started in 2012 as a "catch-all" journal for manuscripts not in scope for other JMIR titles. Since 2015 it has been indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI). Consistent with Clarivates' recent announcement on all journals in the Web of Science Core Collection receiving an impact factor in 2023, we are looking forward to receive the first official impact factor in June 2023. In the meantime, we are rejuvenating the journal with a new editor-in-chief and an international editorial board to become a major interdisciplinary medical open access journal, further expanding JMIR Publications' scope of publications beyond its' traditional digital health focus.  

Interactive Journal of Medical Research Receives Prestigious DOAJ Seal
JMIR Publications is happy to announce that the Interactive Journal of Medical Research has been awarded the prestigious Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) Seal. The DOAJ Seal is awarded to journals that demonstrate best practice in open access publishing. Only 10% of the 15,000 peer-reviewed journals indexed in DOAJ have been awarded this Seal. The DOAJ applies strict criteria to review and index Open Access journals, which include licensing, quality control, journal website, and editorial evaluation to name a few. The DOAJ Seal is awarded for additional best practices including the use of persistent identifiers, long-term digital preservation, XML metadata supply, and Creative Commons licensing.Having JMIR Publications’ journals indexed in DOAJ is significant. The cOAlition S/Plan S Journal Tracker Tool (JCT) uses DOAJ-indexed journals as key criteria to assess whether journal policies comply with funder mandates of Open Access cOAlition S. cOAlition S, an initiative to make full and immediate Open Access to research publications...
read more

i-JMR Impact Factor projection for 2016
(Toronto, 6 Feb 2017, updated 4 Dec 2017) About a year ago, we calculated a projected impact factor 2015 for i-JMR. We now repeated this exercise for the 2016 impact factor (which can by definition only be calculated in 2017). The 2016 impact factor of a journal can be calculated as follows (Wikipedia): 2016 impact factor = A/B where: A = the number of times that all items published in that journal in 2014/15 were cited by indexed publications during 2015.B = the total number of "citable items" published by that journal in 2014/15. We are proud to report that the projected impact factor for i-JMR (2016) is 2.27, calculated from 84 (citations in 2016) / 37 (citable published articles 2014-2015). Disclaimer: Calculations are our own and are not provided or endorsed by Clarivate Analytics, the owner of Web of Science and the Journal Citation Reports.

Latest Submissions Open to Peer Review

View All
What predicts dropout from and behaviour change in a digital health tool? Investigation in obstetrics and safe communication.
Lukas Kötting, Vinayak Anand-Kumar, Franziska Maria Keller, Nils Tobias Henschel, Sonia Lippke
Date Submitted: Apr 16, 2023
Open Peer Review Period: Apr 16, 2023 - Jun 11, 2023
Background: Research has shown an increase in patient education internet interventions, based in health communication tools via apps and mHealth applications to foster the relation and communication behaviour between physicians and patients and thereby improving clinical care. Specifically, in the medical field of obstetrics, safe communication behaviour plays a crucial role, and pregnant women in particular would benefit from digitally delivered interventions to improve their safe communication behaviour. However, research testing this is scarce. Thus, little is known about the success of such an endeavour, potential behavioural barriers for engagement, as well as the processes by which such an internet intervention might improve safe communication behaviour.
Objective: The current study filled this research gap, by applying a web-app aimed to improve pregnant women’s safe communication behaviour in clinical care.
Methods: Thereby the focus lay on investigating the processes behind safe communication behaviour while identifying potential barriers for engagement with the web-app´s content.
Results: N= 1187 pregnant women were recruited and started participating in the web app. The ten lessons in the web app targeted participants intention, planning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancy beliefs to improve safe communication behaviour. The intervention was based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model, that has proven fruitful in explaining safe communication behaviour within previous research. Firstly, a behavioural risk factor for early internet intervention dropout was identified: younger age at intervention start. Additionally, our analyses revealed that capacity for action planning was the best predictor for successful behavioural change over the course of the app. Lastly, sequential mediation analyses revealed a mechanism behind this change, whereby self-efficacy beliefs affected the intention to communicate safely which in turn elicited action planning and thereby improved safe communication behaviour.
Conclusions: Concluding, this research shows how internet supported interventions can be utilized to improve pregnant women´s safe communication behaviour in obstetrics care. Interventions improved safe communication behaviour along the constructs of the HAPA framework and thus similarly to a broad range of other health behaviours. Future research should build upon the gained insights conducting similar internet interventions in related fields of clinical care and/ or improve upon insights relating to processes of behaviour change, internet intervention success and minimizing dropout. Clinical Trial: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03855735
add me as a reviewer

The spread of medical fake news during the COVID-19 pandemic: Quantitative study and lessons learned
Małgorzata Chlabicz, Aleksandra Nabożny, Jolanta Koszelew, Wojciech Łaguna, Paweł Sowa, Wojciech Budny, Katarzyna Guziejko, Magdalena Róg-Makal, Sławomir Pancewicz, Maciej Kondrusik, Piotr Czupryna, Beata Cudowska, Dariusz Lebensztejn, Anna M. Moniuszko-Malinowska, Karol A. Kamiński, Anna Szpakowicz
Date Submitted: Apr 14, 2023
Open Peer Review Period: Apr 14, 2023 - Jun 09, 2023
Background: The phenomenon of the rapid generation and spread of misinformation about the novel coronavirus COVID-19 during the pandemic was evident and attracted many researchers. However, there are more health-related topics polluting the Internet with misinformation that are not as widely studied.
Objective: The aim of our experiment was to assess the reach of the most popular medical content, not limited to the subject of the pandemic, in the World Wide Web (WWW). We evaluated the content for subject matter and credibility in 2021 and 2022. The content was evaluated according to the principles of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) by experienced clinicians.
Methods: We used 274 keywords to perform web page searches using the BuzzSumo Enterprise Application. The keywords were selected according to medical topics which were obtained via questionnaires given to the medical practitioners. The search was limited to two specific date ranges: (1) Jan. 1, 2021 to Dec. 31, 2021; (2) Jan. 1, 2022 to Dec. 31, 2022. We limited searches to web pages in Polish language and filtered them by the selected dates. The analysis included 161 web pages retrieved from 2021 and 105 retrieved from 2022. Each web page was reviewed by an experienced doctor in terms of credibility. The evaluation was performed in accordance with EBM standards. Additionally, we collected data about social media engagements related to the web pages.
Results: The proportion of non-credible contents about COVID-19 significantly decreased in 2022 as compared to 2021. The percentage of non-credible web pages with the topics COVID-19 and general vaccinations changed from 57% to 24% and 42% to 30%, respectively. However, simultaneously there was a significant rise in non-credible contents and their spread in social media regarding other medical topics. The percentage of non-credible web pages with the topic cholesterol and statins and cardiology increased from 17% to 26% and from 18% to 26%, respectively.
Conclusions: Actions taken during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent the spread of fake news appear to have been effective. However, our analysis indicates that such interventions should be applied continuously to existing and emergent medical topics. It seems that topics other than the virus were “filling up the vacuum” created by the decreasing interest in the pandemic.
add me as a reviewer

Long-Term Outcomes of a Comprehensive Mobile Smoking Cessation Program with Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Adult Smokers: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Jennifer D Marler, Craig A Fujii, MacKenzie T Utley, Daniel J Balbierz, Joseph A Galanko, David S Utley
Date Submitted: Apr 13, 2023
Open Peer Review Period: Apr 13, 2023 - Apr 27, 2023
Background: Increased smartphone ownership has been accompanied by the development of mobile smoking cessation programs. While the related body of evidence, through conduct of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), has grown in quality and rigor, there is a need for longer-term data to assess associated smoking cessation durability.
Objective: The primary aim was to compare smoking cessation outcomes at 52 weeks in adult smokers randomized to a mobile smoking cessation program: Pivot (intervention) versus QuitGuide (control). Secondary aims included comparison of other smoking-related behaviors and outcomes, participant feedback, and exploratory analyses of baseline factors associated with smoking cessation.
Methods: In this remote pilot RCT, cigarette smokers in the U.S. were recruited online. Participants were offered 12 weeks of free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Data were self-reported via online questionnaire, with videoconference biovalidation in participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (PPA). Outcomes focused on cessation rates with additional assessment of quit attempts, cigarettes per day (CPD), self-efficacy via the Smoking Abstinence Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SASEQ), NRT use and participant feedback. Cessation outcomes included self-reported 7- and 30-day PPA, abstinence from all tobacco products and continuous abstinence. PPA and continuous abstinence were biovalidated via witnessed breath carbon monoxide (CO) samples. Exploratory post hoc regression analyses were performed to identify baseline variables associated with smoking cessation.
Results: Participants comprised 188 smokers (94 Pivot, 94 QuitGuide): mean (SD) age 46.4 (9.2) years, 104 women (55.3%), 128 White individuals (68.1%), mean (SD) CPD 17.6 (9.0). Several cessation rates were higher in Pivot (intention to treat, ITT): self-reported continuous abstinence: 20% (19/94) versus QuitGuide 9% (8/94) (P=.03), biochemically confirmed abstinence: 31% (29/94) versus QuitGuide 18% (17/94) (P=.04), and biochemically confirmed continuous abstinence: 19% (18/94) versus QuitGuide 9% (8/94) (P=.046). More Pivot participants (99%, 93/94 versus 85%, 80/94 in QuitGuide, P
add me as a reviewer

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interactive Journal of Medical Research WS JMIR Publications Content Update Alert, Friday 21st April 2023 RECENTLY PUBLISHED SUPPORTING MIDWIFERY STUDENTS DURING CLINICAL PRACTICE: RESULTS OF A SYSTEMATIC SCOPING REVIEW Hafaza Amod, Sipho Wellington Mkhize Source: freepik.com; Copyright: pch.vector; URL: License: Licensed by JMIR. Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 21); 12(1):e36380 HTML (open access): PDF (free): Background: Midwifery educators are highly concerned about the quality of clinical support offered to midwifery students during clinical placement. The unpreparedness of midwifery practitioners in mentorship roles and responsibilities affects the competence levels of the next-generation midwives being produced. Objective: The aim of this paper is to highlight various clinical support interventions to support midwifery students globally and propose a framework to guide mentorship training in South Africa... read more Facebook Twitter CREATION OF A HOLISTIC PLATFORM FOR HEALTH BOOSTING USING A BLOCKCHAIN-BASED APPROACH: DEVELOPMENT STUDY Juan Lopez-Barreiro, Luis Alvarez-Sabucedo, Jose-Luis Garcia-Soidan, Juan M Santos-Gago Source: Freepik; Copyright: Freepik; URL: License: Licensed by JMIR. Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 19); 12(1):e44135 HTML (open access): PDF (free): Background: Low adherence to healthy habits, which is associated with a higher risk of disease and death, among citizens of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries is a serious concern. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the physical activity (PA) guidelines for Americans provide recommendations on PA and healthy diets. To promote these habits, we suggest using a blockchain-based platform, using the PA Messaging Framework to deliver messages and rewards to users. Blockchain is a decentralized secure platform for data management, which can be used for value-added controls and services such as smart contracts (SCs), oracles, and decentralized applications (dApps). Of note, there is a substantial penetration of blockchain technologies in the field of PA, but there is a need for more implementations of dApps to take advantage of features such as nonfungible tokens. Objective: This study aimed to create a comprehensive platform for promoting healthy habits, using scientific evidence and blockchain technology. The platform will use gamification to encourage healthy PA and eating habits; in addition, it will monitor the activities through noninvasive means, evaluate them using open-source software, and follow up through blockchain messages... read more Facebook Twitter THE RELATION BETWEEN STUDENTS’ THEORETICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICAL SKILLS IN ENDODONTICS: RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS Franziska Haupt, Philipp Kanzow Student training of endodontic treatments using phantom heads. Source: University Medical Center Göttingen; Copyright: Patrice Kunte; URL: Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 18); 12(1):e46305 HTML (open access): PDF (free): Background: Dental undergraduate students are required to show sufficient practical skills prior to treating patients. Practical skills and the underlying theoretical knowledge are taught in preclinical courses. Usually, the learning outcome is assessed in written multiple-choice examinations (theoretical knowledge) and practical skills tests. However, students’ assessment of practical skills is more time consuming and prone to bias than objective multiple-choice examinations. Objective: This study aims to analyze the relation between students’ theoretical knowledge and practical skills in endodontics. Furthermore, the predictive validity of a theoretical knowledge assessment on students’ practical skills was assessed... read more Facebook Twitter EVOLUTION OF HEALTH INFORMATION SHARING BETWEEN HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS: POTENTIAL OF NONFUNGIBLE TOKENS Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh AI-generated image, in response to the request "a picture to show two physicians are sharing health information of patients", (Generator: Daelle-E2/ OpenAI, March 16th, 2023, Requestor: Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh). Source: Created with DALL-E2, an AI system by OpenAI; Copyright: N/A (AI-generated image); URL: (CC0). Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 12); 12(1):e42685 HTML (open access): PDF (free): This study attempts to explain the development and progress of the technology used for sharing health information across health care organizations (such as hospitals and physicians’ offices). First, we describe the strengths and weaknesses of traditional sharing models, health information exchange (HIE), and blockchain-based HIE. Second, the potential use of nonfungible token (NFT) protocols in HIE models is proposed as the next possible move for information-sharing initiatives in health care. In addition to some potential opportunities and distinguishing features (eg, ownability, verifiability, and incentivization), we identify the uncertainty and risks associated with the application of NFTs, such as the lack of a dedicated regulatory framework for legal ownership of digital patient data. This paper is among the first to discuss the potential of NFTs in health care. The use of NFTs in HIE networks could generate a new stream of research for future studies. This study provides practical insights into how the technological foundations of information-sharing efforts in health care have developed and diversified from earlier forms. Facebook Twitter EFFECTS OF ANTIDEPRESSANTS ON COVID-19 OUTCOMES: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ON LARGE-SCALE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD DATA Md Mahmudur Rahman, Atqiya Munawara Mahi, Rachel Melamed, Mohammad Arif Ul Alam Source: Pexels; Copyright: Atypeek Dgn; URL: License: Licensed by JMIR. R ST NSRRGSR S N N e Grea RN fES T k;l ESE ARG O Interact J Med Res 2023 (Apr 11); 12(1):e39455 HTML (open access): PDF (free): Background: Antidepressants exert an anticholinergic effect in varying degrees, and various classes of antidepressants can produce a different effect on immune function. While the early use of antidepressants has a notional effect on COVID-19 outcomes, the relationship between the risk of COVID-19 severity and the use of antidepressants has not been properly investigated previously owing to the high costs involved with clinical trials. Large-scale observational data and recent advancements in statistical analysis provide ample opportunity to virtualize a clinical trial to discover the detrimental effects of the early use of antidepressants. Objective: We primarily aimed to investigate electronic health records for causal effect estimation and use the data for discovering the causal effects of early antidepressant use on COVID-19 outcomes. As a secondary aim, we developed methods for validating our causal effect estimation pipeline... read more Facebook Twitter LATEST ANNOUNCEMENTS View All i-JMR to receive Impact Factor in 2023 (Toronto, July 27, 2022) The Interactive Journal of Medical Research started in 2012 as a "catch-all" journal for manuscripts not in scope for other JMIR titles. Since 2015 it has been indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI). Consistent with Clarivates' recent announcement on all journals in the Web of Science Core Collection receiving an impact factor in 2023, we are looking forward to receive the first official impact factor in June 2023. In the meantime, we are rejuvenating the journal with a new editor-in-chief and an international editorial board to become a major interdisciplinary medical open access journal, further expanding JMIR Publications' scope of publications beyond its' traditional digital health focus.   Facebook Twitter Interactive Journal of Medical Research Receives Prestigious DOAJ Seal JMIR Publications is happy to announce that the Interactive Journal of Medical Research has been awarded the prestigious Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) Seal. The DOAJ Seal is awarded to journals that demonstrate best practice in open access publishing. Only 10% of the 15,000 peer-reviewed journals indexed in DOAJ have been awarded this Seal. The DOAJ applies strict criteria to review and index Open Access journals, which include licensing, quality control, journal website, and editorial evaluation to name a few. The DOAJ Seal is awarded for additional best practices including the use of persistent identifiers, long-term digital preservation, XML metadata supply, and Creative Commons licensing.Having JMIR Publications’ journals indexed in DOAJ is significant. The cOAlition S/Plan S Journal Tracker Tool (JCT) uses DOAJ-indexed journals as key criteria to assess whether journal policies comply with funder mandates of Open Access cOAlition S. cOAlition S, an initiative to make full and immediate Open Access to research publications... read more Facebook Twitter i-JMR Impact Factor projection for 2016 (Toronto, 6 Feb 2017, updated 4 Dec 2017) About a year ago, we calculated a projected impact factor 2015 for i-JMR. We now repeated this exercise for the 2016 impact factor (which can by definition only be calculated in 2017). The 2016 impact factor of a journal can be calculated as follows (Wikipedia): 2016 impact factor = A/B where: A = the number of times that all items published in that journal in 2014/15 were cited by indexed publications during 2015.B = the total number of "citable items" published by that journal in 2014/15. We are proud to report that the projected impact factor for i-JMR (2016) is 2.27, calculated from 84 (citations in 2016) / 37 (citable published articles 2014-2015). Disclaimer: Calculations are our own and are not provided or endorsed by Clarivate Analytics, the owner of Web of Science and the Journal Citation Reports. Facebook Twitter LATEST SUBMISSIONS OPEN TO PEER REVIEW View All What predicts dropout from and behaviour change in a digital health tool? Investigation in obstetrics and safe communication. Lukas Kötting, Vinayak Anand-Kumar, Franziska Maria Keller, Nils Tobias Henschel, Sonia Lippke Date Submitted: Apr 16, 2023 Open Peer Review Period: Apr 16, 2023 - Jun 11, 2023 Background: Research has shown an increase in patient education internet interventions, based in health communication tools via apps and mHealth applications to foster the relation and communication behaviour between physicians and patients and thereby improving clinical care. Specifically, in the medical field of obstetrics, safe communication behaviour plays a crucial role, and pregnant women in particular would benefit from digitally delivered interventions to improve their safe communication behaviour. However, research testing this is scarce. Thus, little is known about the success of such an endeavour, potential behavioural barriers for engagement, as well as the processes by which such an internet intervention might improve safe communication behaviour. Objective: The current study filled this research gap, by applying a web-app aimed to improve pregnant women’s safe communication behaviour in clinical care. Methods: Thereby the focus lay on investigating the processes behind safe communication behaviour while identifying potential barriers for engagement with the web-app´s content. Results: N= 1187 pregnant women were recruited and started participating in the web app. The ten lessons in the web app targeted participants intention, planning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancy beliefs to improve safe communication behaviour. The intervention was based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model, that has proven fruitful in explaining safe communication behaviour within previous research. Firstly, a behavioural risk factor for early internet intervention dropout was identified: younger age at intervention start. Additionally, our analyses revealed that capacity for action planning was the best predictor for successful behavioural change over the course of the app. Lastly, sequential mediation analyses revealed a mechanism behind this change, whereby self-efficacy beliefs affected the intention to communicate safely which in turn elicited action planning and thereby improved safe communication behaviour. Conclusions: Concluding, this research shows how internet supported interventions can be utilized to improve pregnant women´s safe communication behaviour in obstetrics care. Interventions improved safe communication behaviour along the constructs of the HAPA framework and thus similarly to a broad range of other health behaviours. Future research should build upon the gained insights conducting similar internet interventions in related fields of clinical care and/ or improve upon insights relating to processes of behaviour change, internet intervention success and minimizing dropout. Clinical Trial: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03855735 add me as a reviewer Facebook Twitter The spread of medical fake news during the COVID-19 pandemic: Quantitative study and lessons learned Małgorzata Chlabicz, Aleksandra Nabożny, Jolanta Koszelew, Wojciech Łaguna, Paweł Sowa, Wojciech Budny, Katarzyna Guziejko, Magdalena Róg-Makal, Sławomir Pancewicz, Maciej Kondrusik, Piotr Czupryna, Beata Cudowska, Dariusz Lebensztejn, Anna M. Moniuszko-Malinowska, Karol A. Kamiński, Anna Szpakowicz Date Submitted: Apr 14, 2023 Open Peer Review Period: Apr 14, 2023 - Jun 09, 2023 Background: The phenomenon of the rapid generation and spread of misinformation about the novel coronavirus COVID-19 during the pandemic was evident and attracted many researchers. However, there are more health-related topics polluting the Internet with misinformation that are not as widely studied. Objective: The aim of our experiment was to assess the reach of the most popular medical content, not limited to the subject of the pandemic, in the World Wide Web (WWW). We evaluated the content for subject matter and credibility in 2021 and 2022. The content was evaluated according to the principles of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) by experienced clinicians. Methods: We used 274 keywords to perform web page searches using the BuzzSumo Enterprise Application. The keywords were selected according to medical topics which were obtained via questionnaires given to the medical practitioners. The search was limited to two specific date ranges: (1) Jan. 1, 2021 to Dec. 31, 2021; (2) Jan. 1, 2022 to Dec. 31, 2022. We limited searches to web pages in Polish language and filtered them by the selected dates. The analysis included 161 web pages retrieved from 2021 and 105 retrieved from 2022. Each web page was reviewed by an experienced doctor in terms of credibility. The evaluation was performed in accordance with EBM standards. Additionally, we collected data about social media engagements related to the web pages. Results: The proportion of non-credible contents about COVID-19 significantly decreased in 2022 as compared to 2021. The percentage of non-credible web pages with the topics COVID-19 and general vaccinations changed from 57% to 24% and 42% to 30%, respectively. However, simultaneously there was a significant rise in non-credible contents and their spread in social media regarding other medical topics. The percentage of non-credible web pages with the topic cholesterol and statins and cardiology increased from 17% to 26% and from 18% to 26%, respectively. Conclusions: Actions taken during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent the spread of fake news appear to have been effective. However, our analysis indicates that such interventions should be applied continuously to existing and emergent medical topics. It seems that topics other than the virus were “filling up the vacuum” created by the decreasing interest in the pandemic. add me as a reviewer Facebook Twitter Long-Term Outcomes of a Comprehensive Mobile Smoking Cessation Program with Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Adult Smokers: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial Jennifer D Marler, Craig A Fujii, MacKenzie T Utley, Daniel J Balbierz, Joseph A Galanko, David S Utley Date Submitted: Apr 13, 2023 Open Peer Review Period: Apr 13, 2023 - Apr 27, 2023 Background: Increased smartphone ownership has been accompanied by the development of mobile smoking cessation programs. While the related body of evidence, through conduct of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), has grown in quality and rigor, there is a need for longer-term data to assess associated smoking cessation durability. Objective: The primary aim was to compare smoking cessation outcomes at 52 weeks in adult smokers randomized to a mobile smoking cessation program: Pivot (intervention) versus QuitGuide (control). Secondary aims included comparison of other smoking-related behaviors and outcomes, participant feedback, and exploratory analyses of baseline factors associated with smoking cessation. Methods: In this remote pilot RCT, cigarette smokers in the U.S. were recruited online. Participants were offered 12 weeks of free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Data were self-reported via online questionnaire, with videoconference biovalidation in participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (PPA). Outcomes focused on cessation rates with additional assessment of quit attempts, cigarettes per day (CPD), self-efficacy via the Smoking Abstinence Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SASEQ), NRT use and participant feedback. Cessation outcomes included self-reported 7- and 30-day PPA, abstinence from all tobacco products and continuous abstinence. PPA and continuous abstinence were biovalidated via witnessed breath carbon monoxide (CO) samples. Exploratory post hoc regression analyses were performed to identify baseline variables associated with smoking cessation. Results: Participants comprised 188 smokers (94 Pivot, 94 QuitGuide): mean (SD) age 46.4 (9.2) years, 104 women (55.3%), 128 White individuals (68.1%), mean (SD) CPD 17.6 (9.0). Several cessation rates were higher in Pivot (intention to treat, ITT): self-reported continuous abstinence: 20% (19/94) versus QuitGuide 9% (8/94) (P=.03), biochemically confirmed abstinence: 31% (29/94) versus QuitGuide 18% (17/94) (P=.04), and biochemically confirmed continuous abstinence: 19% (18/94) versus QuitGuide 9% (8/94) (P=.046). More Pivot participants (99%, 93/94 versus 85%, 80/94 in QuitGuide, P add me as a reviewer Facebook Twitter Your username is and your email address is [email protected]. We do not have your ORCID on file - please register for one at Please login at To submit your paper to Interactive Journal of Medical Research or another JMIR journal, go to click the button below. 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